It’s time to start crocheting slippers!

weather 1.5.2016
Weather forecast for January 5-11, 2016 from tbo.com/weather

Woohoo! Last week, I turned off the air conditioner and opened the windows. I love Florida winters. We get sunshine and cool breezes, and all the birds from up north to eat up our mosquitoes. Today my grown daughter and I sat out on the front porch to enjoy the weather and work on some yarn crafts. She worked a loom while I crocheted. It was perfect sweater-weather, but tonight it’s predicted to drop to 55 degrees. Brr! Time to start making slippers.

But first, I need to announce that the December holidays contest for free copy editing is closed and a winner has been chosen. She was contacted privately and it turns out, she already has a manuscript ready! How cool is that?

Now, on to the slippers. I make slippers (and lap blankets, hats, and wheelchair purses) for charity, and also for friends and family and myself. This is my favorite slipper pattern, because it’s simple, simple, simple. I like to crochet while listening to something silly on TV or–like today–while chatting with friends and neighbors. These slippers are perfect for that level of inattentiveness.

crochet profile pic
These are my feet, and not those of a professional sock model, as you may have guessed.

These slippers are my variation of the Simple Crochet Slippers pattern on Zoom Yummy.

The original pattern is more open, more like ballet slippers, and more suited to our warmer weather. Still, I prefer something warmer that completely covers my feet. And since I make these for charity, I have bedridden people in mind. These slippers won’t easily come off in bed. I make them with washable and dryable yarn, so the slippers can get tossed into the washer and dryer along with regular socks. (Remove the ribbon before washing.) I think I made the ones in the picture with Red Heart’s Super Saver yarn.

Mindless Slipper Pattern (make two if you have two feet)

I use medium-weight washable and dryable yarn, a size H hook, about 24 inches of ribbon, a yarn needle, and a stitch marker. Adjustable for various sizes.

ch=chain stitch; dc=double crochet; sl st=slip stitch

Foundation Row 1: ch3, sl st into 1st ch to form ring

Row 2: ch3 (acts as 1st dc), 7 more dc into center of ring (8 dc), sl st to join

Row 3: ch3 (acts as 1st dc), 1 dc into 1st st (same as 1st dc), 2 dc in each st around (16 dc), sl st to close

Row 4: ch3 (acts as 1st dc), 1 dc in 1st st, *2 dc in next st, 1 dc in next st*, repeat * all the way around, (24 st), sl st to close.

Row 5-15: ch3 (acts as 1st dc). Attach a stitch marker and leave it there. From this point: *1 dc in each dc around in rounds*. Make as many rounds as it takes to cover foot from toe to ankle. 15 rows makes a loose (wide) women’s size 9. Add more or less for your slipper size. If it’s too loose, use a smaller hook. If it’s too tight, use a larger hook. Finish the rounds directly above the stitch marker. Sl st to join.

Row 16-21: *1 dc in each st all the way around, leaving the last 3 stitches unworked. Ch3 and turn*. Repeat * as many times as it takes to reach the back of the foot comfortably.

Sew up the back using a yarn needle and yarn. Remember, that seam will be inside the slipper, so make it tight enough to hold and cover, but loose enough to still be comfortable and not rub the foot.

Add the ankle. Flip slipper seam side in. Start at the front of the opening, leaving the front 5-7 stitches unworked (the center stitch, plus an equal number of stitches to the left and to the right of the center).

Row 1-3: ch 3 (acts as 1st dc), *1 dc in each dc around, leaving the front stitches unworked, ch 3 and turn*. After the 1st round, check to make sure the foot can get into the slipper. If it’s too tight, add more unworked stitches until it fits. Continue * for 2 or 3 rows, depending on how high up on the ankle you want it.

Weave in a length of ribbon at the ankle for a tie. Don’t wash with the ribbon, because that will make a very tight knot that’s hard to get out. To clean ribbon, hand wash, and air dry.

***

And that’s it! If you make these slippers, post a picture! If you find any mistakes in the pattern, let me know and I’ll fix it.

What crafts do you do on a cold January afternoon? Pictures, please!

 

 

 

 

 


One thought on “It’s time to start crocheting slippers!

  1. I’m in the middle of crocheting a bath mat for the kids’ bathroom. It’s a new stitch I’ve learned which leaves a loop drawn up on the outside of the project. So the end piece should look something like a shag carpet or plushy loop rug. When it’s finished (if it turns out) I’ll post pictures. 🙂

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